2015年8月31日 星期一

以現代化為名 改變校徽




//這次中大換標誌,我只能說,還好他們保留了原來的校徽部分,據大學的簡介:「本校以中國神話中之『鳳』為校徽,蓋自漢代以來,鳳即被視為『南方之鳥』,且素為高貴、美麗、忠耿及莊嚴之象徵。以紫與金為校色,取意在紫色象徵熱誠與忠耿,金色象徵堅毅與果敢。」但願他們將來也不要以現代化為名改變它,即使校徽的線條複雜,經過多年的優質口碑,也就能成為受人尊敬的名牌,不用什麼簡化以便「容易辯識」。//
大學的標誌或校徽是一個有趣的問題,我們看的大學'logo'都是個'composit...
THESTANDNEWS.COM

暫停學界的評鑑

 2015/8/30暫停學界的評鑑文 / 黃達夫台北
我從來不否認評鑑是幫助一所機構進步的方法之一,譬如,我們醫院自願參與了三次美國的國際醫院評鑑(JCI)。
它有一個非常清楚的評鑑目標,就是病人安全與醫療品質的維護。所有的要求都是為了達成此目標。而且,每一次評鑑標準都往上拉,要求更嚴格,檢視更深入。在一次又一次準備評鑑的過程,讓我們的同事對於病人安全與醫療品質的觀念愈來愈清楚,也更知道如何將觀念化為行動。
同事們都認為醫院每年所經歷大大小小的評鑑中,JCI的評鑑過程最痛苦,卻是最具學習價值的評鑑。我則認為人都有惰性,組織更容易安於現狀,只有定期接受外部的檢視,才可能推著我們往前走。
但是,我不得不說,橘逾淮變枳,雖然國內很多的評鑑多半都是效法國外的制度,但是,執行起來,卻都迷失了它的精神及核心價值,實地評鑑時,甚至遺忘了評鑑的目標。總是捨本逐末,在枝微末節上面鑽牛角尖,而令人啼笑皆非。

譬如醫院的教學,應該是臨床教學,評鑑時,重點應放在臨床教學的方法及內涵,檢視在該醫院接受實習的醫學生和醫事人員,是否學到照顧病人的能力。但是,台灣的評鑑卻只在乎教師有沒有寫論文,學生的學習護照有沒有簽章,醫院有沒有中飽衛福部所補助的幾萬塊教學鐘點費入醫院私囊……。
期盼好的評鑑制度 促進進步
對我而言,醫院的臨床教學與病人的照護同等重要。為了傳承,醫院須要培養新一代的好醫事人員來照顧病人。而臨床教學的主軸是「做中學」。這就跟學習開車一樣,必須自己坐上駕駛座,但是,不能獨自上路,須有教練在旁指導,必要時及時接手,才能確保交通安全。同樣的,醫事人員也要在第一線學習照顧病人,須有教師在旁嚴謹地督導,才能確保病人的安全。所以,我非常注重臨床教學,不但會減輕教學老師的門診量,對於特別用心的教師,其年終獎金還可能是原月薪的兩、三倍。臨床教學不是開課,是隨時幫助學生的熱忱,是以身作則,是適時的指導,很難算時間,去斤斤計較教師教學的時數,給幾百塊鐘點費,豈不是侮辱我的同事。
近日看到「教師評鑑能淘汰不適任教師嗎?」、「我們需要怎樣的老師?會教書還是會寫報告?」等評論時,心有戚戚焉。我非常同意作者說「每當教育部(衛福部)有任何政策改變時,都會對基層教師(醫師)的工作產生非常大的影響,這些政策的出發點通常是善意的,但問題是『通往地獄的路往往是善意所鋪陳的』」。
也許台灣教育界應來一次評鑑的moratorium,一切歸零。再由一群在第一線教出會思考而不是會考試的學生的好老師,以及有實務經驗,而不是只會寫論文的教育專家,共同來規劃真正能夠促進進步的評鑑制度。
(原文刊載於2015年8月號《遠見雜誌》專欄)

2015年8月28日 星期五

Boston Conservatory and Berklee Exploring Merger

Boston Conservatory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Conservatory
The Boston Conservatory is a performing arts conservatory located in the Fenway-Kenmore region of Boston, Massachusetts, United States. It grants ...

Boston Conservatory and Berklee Exploring Merger that ...

https://www.berklee.edu/.../boston-conservatory-berklee-explore-merger...
Jun 26, 2015 - Berklee and The Boston Conservatory have signed a memorandum of understanding that could pave the way toward an eventual merger that ...



【晚間音樂新聞| Muzik Online】文/林采韻
好鄰居合為一體 百克里和波士頓音樂學院
兩校在意向書簽訂的聲明中,不斷強調「探索」(explore)兩字,試想賦予21世紀音樂與表演藝術教育新的想像,百克里甚至早已「遠見」2025,抱持要改造未來音樂教育的決心。兩者合併後,學生獲得的直接益處包括,波士頓音樂學院的學生,除了接觸到百克里多樣的音樂形式與風格,還有機會參與音樂技術、商業管理等課程。百克里的學生,在波士頓音樂學院裡,有機會接受學院派的音樂訓練,同時學習舞蹈、劇場等音樂之外的藝術...兩校聯姻完整新聞請看http://bit.ly/1KRPWxf
⋯⋯更多
這樁音樂學院的聯姻事件,雖然發生在美國波士頓,卻有可能顛覆現有音...
MUZIK-ONLINE.COM

2015年8月27日 星期四

哈佛大學校長 Drew Faust 的領導力 2014-15

ICYMI: As freshmen move in and Harvard administrators prepare for a new year, a look back at Drew Faust's leadership in 2014-15.

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2015/5/28/politics-of-faust/

University President Drew G. Faust seated next to Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh at the opening of the Harvard Ed Portal at its new location in Allston in February. 

The Politics of Drew Faust


When University President Drew G. Faust got word this April thatstudents were blocking the entrances to Massachusetts Hall, she found another place to work without much of a thought.
The demonstrators, members of the activist group Divest Harvard, were demanding that the University divest its $35.9 billion endowment from fossil fuels, a charge that Faust had already refused. But as the protesters attempted to escalate the debate, Faust did not respond for five days. When she did, she tendered an offer that the protesters had already refused during a previous demonstration: a meeting with the president, but on the condition that the protest end. Divest Harvard once again declined, but still ended its blockade the next evening. For Faust, business as usual returned—if it had ever even left.
The academic year 2014-2015 featured a number of public, campus-based challenges to Faust’s leadership. Students blocked her from her office, faculty responded negatively to a newly centralized sexual assault policy, and an even larger group of professors challenged the decision to modify their health benefits plans.
Each of these issues has presented Faust with an opportunity to make headlines, but Harvard’s president of eight years has instead chosen, more often than not, a calculated policy of public non-engagement. When campus news has surfaced, deputies like Provost Alan M. Garber ’76 and Dean of the College Rakesh Khurana have often made initial statements to constituents and the press, while Faust has skipped the bully pulpit and engaged behind the scenes.
It is an approach that Faust has adopted intentionally, and one that has allowed her to skate above certain campus issues in the public eye, delighting her supporters and frustrating many of those seeking a response.
“This is my eighth year, so you get a little bit accustomed to the constant surprises and emergence of issues,” Faust, who was installed in 2007, said this month.

Keeping Her Voice Down

The president of Harvard, with all the historical power and prestige of the office, has a voice that people want to hear.
“Every time Harvard sneezes there is a national attention, focus on that issue,” said former Princeton president Shirley M. Tilghman.
It is a reality that Faust seems to internalize.
Divest Harvard
Protesters hang a banner from the upper floors of Massachusetts Hall on the second day of their weeklong April blockade of the administrative building, which houses University President Drew G. Faust’s office. 
“When I publicly engage on an issue, it elevates it,” Faust said in an interview this month. So I want to be very careful of how I use my voice, and when I use my role in a very public way and when I try to work in quieter ways or when I let the people who are directly responsible for issues deal with those issues.”
In 2007, Faust put her philosophy more succinctly. Referencing Harvard Business School professor Michael E. Porter, Faust told the New York Timesthat she often considers the mantra “strategy is what you don’t do.”
Perhaps the most visible manifestation of this approach is Faust’s fraught relationship with the Divest Harvard protesters, who have staged four Massachusetts Hall protests in the last 13 months, each aimed at disrupting University business and generating a public presidential response. Those responses have been few and far between.
“I think it’s extremely disrespectful,” Divest Harvard co-coordinator Talia K. Rothstein ’17 said this month. “We want to talk about the people who are being affected, and she won’t go near them because she won’t go near us.”
Protesters have increasingly targeted Faust and her office this year, but unlike predecessor Neil L. Rudenstine, who went to work in Mass. Hall as two-dozen protesters occupied it demanding higher wages for Harvard staff members, Faust gave the demonstrators little face time. And while the living wage protesters of 2001 spent three weeks in Mass. Hall, during the 2015 sit-in, the Harvard University Police Department quickly shut down bathroom access, making an extended stay difficult. The sit-in lasted 24 hours.
It was a strategy of limited engagement: While Faust did not give the protesters the public meeting they requested, Rothstein said no participants have faced discipline for breaking University rules.
Still, the lack of presidential attention has bothered some. Bill Jaeger, director of Harvard Union of Clerical and Technical Workers, questioned the tactic.
“As someone who has been on campus on a long time, it's interesting how dismissive or hard-edged the current administration has been,” Jaeger said. “I think there have been other moments at Harvard where there has been much more of a tendency to bring protesters cookies or hot chocolate.”
Harvard President Drew G. Faust walks out of University Hall last year after the Faculty of Arts and Sciences approve the College's first honor code. 

Faculty Friction

Student protests are nothing new for Harvard presidents. “1969 was a tough year. What was so tough about this year?” remarked one prominent alumnus, Paul J. Zofnass ’69, in a recent interview.
Still, Faust this year faced challeanges from higher and potentially more potent places. In the fall, dozens of Harvard Law School professors publicly blasted Harvard’s new University-wide sexual assault policy and procedures in an open letter in the Boston Globe. Targeting an initiative championed by Faust, the professors charged that the new procedures lacked adequate fairness and due process standards.
Publicly, Faust was quiet about the criticism. But behind the scenes, she went to work, engaging with the Law School and directing University General Counsel Robert W. Iuliano ’83 to reach “an agreement that would work for everybody.”
In December, the Law School formally stepped out, launching a new set of procedures that broke with Faust’s University-wide approach. Some viewed the move as a challenge to Faust’s central administration; others saw the situation as an example of careful, effective leadership.
“Very few complicated issues are solved by someone putting their foot down and saying, ‘I'm not moving an inch,’” said William F. Lee ’72, the senior fellow of the Harvard Corporation, the University’s highest governing body. “To get to the resolution that the University had with the Law School...required a lot of one-on-one conversation, small group conversations.”

Faust on Law School Op-Ed
University President Drew G. Faust in her Massachusetts Hall office last year. 

Faust also stayed quiet, at first, when members of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences unanimously voted to ask her and the Harvard Corporation to reverse controversial changes to the health benefits plans for non-union employees. Amidst the controversy, Faust simply said she planned on “replying in due course.”
One week later, Faust announced a fund that would compensate faculty members who were affected the most, but said the plans would remain in place for the year.
“One of the things about my job is there's so many parts of it, and people have so much autonomy,” Faust said this month. “I don't control much around here in terms of what students are going to get upset about or what's going on in the world at large that is going to be reflected in the University or faculty issues…. There are always things happening, and that is one of the defining aspects of this job, and you can't get stressed by it.”

A Strategy of Continuation

“A lot of this year was bringing things along that we had begun in one way or another, initiatives that I had introduced as early as the very beginning of my presidency, things like the Common Spaces with the Smith Center, things like the arts initiative with the museum opening,” Faust said in May.
But even in advocating for those initiatives, like a new undergraduate concentration in Theater, Dance, and Media, Faust has embraced a quieter leadership style than predecessor Lawrence H. Summers. It was during Summers’s fall from grace in 2005 and 2006 that Faust, then the dean of the fledgling Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, gained increased stature and recognition within the faculty as an authority on the status of women within Harvard.
In 2007, Faust moved into Mass. Hall as Summers’s replacement and Harvard’s first female president. With Summers’s missteps in her rear view mirror, Faust has stayed away from controversy and focused on seeing through a long-term plan.
The strategy of continuation is different from that of Summers, who favored identifying annual priorities, articulating them publicly, and advocating for them behind the scenes.
“She doesn't come and say, ‘I have one big idea each year,’” Lee said. “She has a series of ideas that are for Harvard in the long term. And they include integrating the University as ‘One Harvard’ where it should be.”
In “One Harvard,” Faust has embraced an initiative that Summers pushed into motion. The concept of centralization has manifested most prominently in Harvard’s first fully University-wide capital campaign. Faust has traveled around the world, from Beijing to Seattle, to meet with donors and host events to promote the fundraising drive that has raised at least $5 billion of its $6.5 billion goal.
Major gifts this academic year, such as Gerald L. Chan’s $350 million pledge to the School of Public Health in September—the largest single donation in Harvard’s history—have shown her to be an adept fundraiser. Chan’s gift made history in more ways than one: In exchange for the money, Faust—the presidentviewed by one observer as “a cautious pick"—and the Corporation agreed to rename the school in honor of Chan’s late father.

Chan and Faust
University President Drew G. Faust welcomes Gerald L. Chan on stage at the unveiling of his foundation's $350 million gift to the Harvard School of Public Health last September. 

But some, including Summers, have urged Harvard to be bolder, not necessarily with naming rights but with a forward-thinking policy direction. In a 2011 Boston Globe op-ed marking the University’s 375th anniversary, Summers wrote that Harvard would have to “risk disruptive change” lest it “cede its preeminence to those with less distinguished histories but a clearer field, a cleaner canvas on which to paint boldly.” Asked about the 2011 op-ed this month, Summers indicated that he worries Harvard might be losing ground, particularly to Stanford, which has posted lower undergraduate acceptance rates than Harvard in the last two years while recruiting a stable of top faculty.
“In the last few years as I have visited Stanford and observed Harvard, the concerns I expressed in the Globe have increased. I hope the pace of change at Harvard will greatly accelerate in the years ahead,” Summers, now a University professor, wrote in an email.

The Loyalists

Eight years is not a short time for the modern University president. Summers lasted five. Neil L. Rudenstine led Harvard, a school known for its proud, occasionally capricious faculty, for 10. But as Faust completes her eighth year, she is showing strong support in many of the right places, particularly with alumni, top donors, and members of Harvard’s governing boards.
“Unfortunately it's true that any president will begin to have difficulties with the faculty after certain years,” said former Overseer Peter L. Malkin ’55. “I think that hers have been less than most. So I think that she's done a good job of that.”
Other Harvard supporters have come across as nothing short of gushing.
“I think President Faust is one of the best leaders I've ever seen in a long career of writing biographies and doing journalism,” said author Walter S. Isaacson ’74, an Overseer who has catalogued the lives of Steve Jobs, Benjamin Franklin, and Albert Einstein. “She’s very calm and insightful when she addresses a problem because she knows how to listen and find a commonsense solution.”
"When I publicly engage on an issue, it elevates it," University President Drew G. Faust said this month. "So I want to be very careful of how I use my voice."

Overseers, Corporation members, and alumni alike credit Faust for her ability to listen and to engage often polar constituencies. Faust’s supporters say these qualities, together with her public patience, have kept small problems contained.
“One of her attributes is her capacity to be disagreeable, sometimes vehemently, but to not have it be personal,” said Overseer Kenji Yoshino ’91. “You realize this is someone who you can disagree with, who welcomes debate. Even if you are on the wrong side of the debate, you are never on the wrong side of her.”
With trust from Harvard’s governing boards and a fundraising apparatus that is plowing ahead, Faust looks forward to completing a campaign that has its sights set on a higher education record, seeing through the University’s Title IX framework, and launching a new undergraduate concentration in the fall.
It is clear that, for Harvard’s veteran president, the support is there and the wheels are turning. But Faust herself acknowledges that “every year has its challenges,” many of them unpredictable. And while Faust’s policy of public non-engagement has served her well, some would like her to take a larger public role.
“I would like her to [use] the bully pulpit of the Harvard presidency to speak out more on national issues, particularly on education and related to problems of K-12 and throughout the country,” Malkin said. “But I think she's trying to lead by example. And I think we need a little more public statement and a little more leadership in the public arena.”
For now, though, Faust is happy with her performance. Asked by The Crimson this month about how she might improve as a leader, she seemed surprised by the question.
“Is this my end-of-the-year performance review?” she asked, jokingly. “How would I answer that?”
—Staff writer Theodore R. Delwiche can be reached at theodore.delwiche@thecrimson.com. Follow him on Twitter @trdelwic.
—Staff writer Mariel A. Klein can be reached at mariel.klein@thecrimson.com. Follow her on Twitter @mariel_klein.

2015年8月23日 星期日

戴明博士 (1900-1993)談對於教師的賞識


戴明博士 (1900-1993) 著Out of the Crisis 中的故事:

遲來的賞識威廉•迪爾(William R. Dill)任職紐約大學企管研究院院長時,大約在1972年,他邀請我一起進行一項研究,調查畢業5年以上的學生目前在做什麼?並詢問他們成功的要件是什麼?其中有一個問題是︰
      您的人生是否受到本校老師的影響?
       如果是,請說出他們的名字。
其中有6位老師的名字,為每一位上過他們的課程的學生都列出來。而且每一位學生都記得他們的名字。除了這6位外,幾乎沒有其他老師被提到。
       不幸的是,這種賞識來得太遲了。學校當局並沒有採取特別措施來留住這6位教授——他們是那種會使學校成名的老師——而他們當中也沒有一位受到學生團體頒贈「本年的偉大老師」獎。

更詳細的資料,如報告名稱和那6位老師的大名,請參考:《紐約大學Stern商學院的百年史》,在網路上讀了相關的重要的一頁:
New York University's Stern School of Business: A Centennial Retrospective
By Abraham L Gitlow, NYU Press, 1995 (Link:Deming博士在: New York University's Stern School of B..._)


黃國昌......算算回國後到現在也已經在大學教了13年書。我一直要求自己上課時,就是專注在專業知識,不要扯閒話。不過,以前一位好友曾經告訴我:當這些學生踏入社會以後,他們不會記得你傳授的專業知識,他們會記得的,反而是你所說過其他的話。

我事後想想,還真的是這樣。對於自己念大學時的教授,我真的不太記得他們說過什麼(好吧,我承認,我是全班翹課第一名),迄今讓我印象最深刻的,反而是去旁聽林山田老師的刑法總則時,他曾經勉勵同學「如果你念法律的目的是賺錢,我建議你趕快轉系」。
我不是很確定自己留給學生的印象是什麼,不過,我想可以無愧於己地說,自己是很認真地在上課。如果「認真」真的是我留給學生的印象,我會很高興。......





2015年8月22日 星期六

普林斯頓、史丹佛等大學有新鮮人入學前讀物.....

已知普林斯頓、史丹佛等大學有新鮮人入學前讀物.....


了不起的制度:該學開學前,已將三本選書寄給全世界的新鮮人。
Incoming freshmen are busy reading three books selected by President John Hennessy. The program is an annual tradition, and this year's selections provide valuable insights about resilience and determination: http://stanford.io/1K8KQAX



2015年8月21日 星期五

Havruta 教育方法(「哈柏露塔」)



他們教出的孩子讓全球12億人都買單,超強「幸福學習法」揭秘

 2015年08月18日 17:18
世界上有30%的諾貝爾獎得主、常春藤聯盟學生,都是用一種叫「哈柏露塔」(Havruta)的教育方法教出來的,這套方法貫穿日常生活,教出了馬克・祖克柏、史蒂芬・史匹伯、愛因斯坦、漢娜鄂蘭等各行各業的翹楚,也是猶太民族教育孩子的最高原則,到底有著什麼樣的魔力?
臉書(Facebook)創辦人馬克・祖克柏(Mark Zuckberg)正是猶太人,23歲成為全球最年輕的億萬富翁,他打造的社交網路帝國,已經有超過十億名成員。
祖克柏的父母總是鼓勵祖克柏解釋自己的想法,「真有意思,解釋給我聽聽看吧!」祖克柏身為醫師的雙親,在祖克柏成長的路上鼓勵他提出疑問,而且以有邏輯的方式與他討論,無論他提出多麼匪夷所思的問題或答案,都不會感到不耐煩。
havruta6.jpg
馬克·祖克柏的父母從小就十分重視他的想法與興趣。(圖/Mark_Zuckberg臉書)  
日常生活的一問一答,漸漸培養出小祖克柏獨立思考的能力,9歲他開始展現對電腦程式的興趣後,父親除了自己教導他程式語言,還聘請專業程式設計師當他的家教,幫助他鑽研興趣。到了高中,祖克柏就已經開發出能向使用者推薦音樂的程式,微軟(Microsoft)和美國線上(AOL)等大企業都爭相延攬。
給予孩子好奇、思考的空間,對孩子擅長的潛能加以培養,就是祖克柏的父母給他的最好禮物,也讓他寫下網際網路世代的成功神話。祖克柏父母的教育方式不是什麼獨門祕技,但也不是能輕易複製的做法,原來,這一切來自於猶太家庭傳統中的「哈柏露塔」。

沒有教師也可以自己學習的方法

哈柏露塔的原意接近英文的fellowship,有夥伴關係、友誼的意思,哈柏露塔的核心概念是兩人一組,透過提問、回答及反駁來進行討論與辯論。但重點不在於辯論輸贏,而是學習如何表達自己、傾聽與思考。
韓國教育學家全聲洙極度推崇哈柏露塔,還遠赴以色列和美國取經,他認為數千年來承受壓迫的猶太人,就是因為無法自在學習的困苦環境,才發展出沒有教師也可以自己學習的方法。
哈柏露塔強調一起學習,討論中的兩個人地位平等,透過立場互換的討論過程,雙方都能放下身段,既讓對方了解自己的想法,也可以傾聽對方的創見,不關注勝敗,反而像跳舞一樣,輪流掌握主導權、培養出很好的默契。 
havruta4.jpg
透過討論與提問,哈柏露塔讓同儕也能是老師。(圖/SJU@flickr
哈柏露塔看來似乎是一般的聊天,但其實大有不同。首先,要將自己所學所知的事,用言語表達出來並讓別人能夠理解,本身就是一大挑戰;哈柏露塔又強調兩人互相挑戰,這時傾聽就十分重要,只有確實聽清楚對方的話,才能掌握話中的脈絡,找出可以說服對方的說法。
而提出問題更是哈柏露塔的精髓,想要與他人辯論,就得努力提出震撼對方邏輯的問題,看似再理所當然的事,也還是要提出疑問,久而久之自然鍛鍊成跳出框架思考的能力,也具備了創意與創造力的第一步。

你重視的是教育,還是升學?

全聲洙關注韓國教育多年,認為韓國家長對教育的無限熱忱,一點也不輸給猶太民族的父母。然而,和台灣一樣,韓國的傳統儒教文化形成「萬般皆下品,唯有讀書高」的意識形態,想提升社會地位只能仰賴學歷,別無他法,於是父母傾注一切資源,只為了讓孩子在教育系統裡拔得頭籌。
天下父母的苦心毋庸置疑,但現今多元開放的時代中,成就不一定只能從硬梆梆的教科書中取得,國際名導演史蒂芬史匹伯就是個最好的例子。史匹伯從小就無心於課業,而且因為家人頻繁的搬遷,加上猶太背景的枷鎖,讓少年時期的史匹伯總是獨自一人。
這樣孤單的孩子,長大後卻製作出《ET・外星人》、《侏羅紀公園》、《搶救雷恩大兵》等史上最多賣座電影,廣受全球觀眾的喜愛,其中關鍵就在於母親無盡的愛和包容。
havruta2.jpg
史蒂芬史匹伯是史上拍過最多賣座電影的導演。(圖/Sam_Howzit@flickr
儘管史匹伯對讀書一點興趣也沒有,他的母親卻從來不曾嘮叨,為了培養孩子的想像力,她每天一定要為小史匹伯讀一篇童話故事,甚至在他少年時期拍攝的第一部電影中擔綱演出德國士兵。多虧母親自始至終的支持,史匹伯的才華才得以開花結果,深受母愛滋養的他,產出一部又一部感人至深的電影,傳達各種形式的愛與歡樂。
再好的學校、教師,也無法給予真誠無盡的愛,許多亞洲家長努力提供孩子最好的讀書環境,卻不乏太少時間相處以至於家庭失和的案例,讓子女在學業有所成就,卻失去了解他們、也讓他們了解父母的機會,這樣的「教育」方式豈不是太浪費父母打拼、孩子苦讀的辛勞了嗎?

你的孩子會主動找你聊天,一聊就是兩小時嗎?

在家庭教育中,哈柏露塔扮演的角色,不僅是訓練孩子敏捷犀利的思維,也讓家人之間的對話變得有趣、令人期待,原因無他,因為雙方平等的對話模式,讓孩子可以安心表達自己的想法,不用怕被父母指責或糾正。
好幾位嘗試哈柏露塔的韓國家長表示,孩子逐漸會主動關心大人的想法,也變得非常期待與爸媽「談話」。家長們逐漸意識到孩子不是自己的重擔也不是自己的化身,孩子擁有自己的獨立性格與思考,讓大人也能從對話中學習到自己沒有過的想法。
havruta3.jpg
每天認真地與家人交流溝通,感情自然緊密。(圖/Israel_photo_gallery@flickr
每天實踐哈柏露塔能培養孩子的思辨能力,但親子互相尊重交流更能增進家庭關係,每個家庭成員都可以感受到彼此的關愛,這麼幸福的學習方法,怎麼會不教出優秀的孩子呢?
本文部分內容經授權取材自大是文化《哈柏露塔:猶太人的教養祕訣 
螢幕快照.png

2015年8月18日 星期二

A Video Game That Teaches You How To Code

New Fig. 1 video: Use spells to navigate through the world, fight off foes and solve problems in CodeSpells, a video game that teaches people to code. Sarah Guthals co-developed the game as part of her research as a doctoral student at UC San Diego and UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering.

Why Science Needs Art: https://youtu.be/-junNCPl3Zs Subscribe!http://bit.ly/1fUWHyY What can you learn from a video game?...
YOUTUBE.COM